Simple Math

 

 

   

I don’t know if it’s just me, or all tile makers, but I love the relationship between hexagons and right triangles. The geometries are simple but so versatile. In this series of tiles, the softness of the insects is a nice contrast to the rigid geometry of these two shapes.

Underglaze Transfers

   

These two vessels came out of the kiln yesterday. They’re first attempts at experimenting with underglaze transfers. I saw a demonstration on Facebook of a similar technique and thought it would be fun to try. Basically, you fill a small squeeze bottle with thinned underglaze and draw on newsprint. When the drawing dries, cut around it with a scissors or Xacto knife and position it on your pot. Using a fairly wet sponge, carefully press it onto the surface. When the newsprint is wet, it clings to the pot. Using the sponge, or a soft rubber rib, gently press on all areas of the transfer. After a couple of minutes, you can peel the newspaper away and your image should be on the pot. I did notice that the longer a transfer sits after drying, the longer it takes to “rehydrate” it.

#good_press_ceramics

I started this blog over seven years ago and, in recent years, have tried to post something at least once a month.
It’s been really nice having this journal to look back on. A few of my old projects are a little underwhelming to me now [for example, some of my early tessellation tiles, furniture pieces, and jewelry ideas] but many still give me a real sense of accomplishment. It’s also great to look back at things with a fresh eye and think about how I would do them differently a second time. This blog has been a very useful tool and I hope to continue posting regularly.
In addition to this blog, I plan to start posting images on Instagram. I’ve hesitated to take on this task because I’d rather spend my time doing things other than looking at my phone. However, I do find myself using this app more often these days as I look for inspiration in ceramics, tessellations, and nature photography. I think I’ll be posting mostly process photos to start as these are some of my favorite posts from other people. This app also allows me to post short videos which might be a fun thing to try. I hope you’ll consider following me. 🙂

 

New Work – Part 2

   

Last week I finished mounting the new tessellation tiles.  I also made a new octopus and squid board since I no longer have one and they’re two of my favorite tiles :).

I combined several finishing techniques in these tiles. First, I applied underglazes to the bisqueware and wiped them away, leaving the colors in recessed areas. Next, I sprayed light coats of underglaze to highlight textures like fur that have been carved into the molds. Lastly, I splattered underglazes with contrasting colors on some of the tiles for more variation. I think it works well on the sea creatures.

I’m already starting to think of other configurations for these new tiles and hope to have some additional boards to show in the coming months. As always, thanks for looking!

New Work – Part 1

         

After months of spraying and layering underglazes and glazes, I’m so happy to finally post this series of panels. The baby birds are the only tiles in this series that were designed this year; the other panels were explorations of new colors and patterns.  I’m especially pleased with the Ray panel. I’ve always liked this tile but, until now, had never set aside the time to make a large enough panel to display them properly. After overcoming years of being afraid to experiment with color, I now find it a challenge to show restraint. I’m glad I was able to hold back on this piece.

Fat Quarters

     

   

     

I’m currently working on eight different tile boards and will post some images when things are a little further along. In the meantime, I thought I’d share a few photos of the fat quarters that arrived in the mail today. In case you’re not familiar with the term, a “fat quarter” is a piece of fabric made by cutting 1/2 a yard of fabric into two equal pieces. I think it’s a hilarious term for a big swatch.

Back in December, while participating in a holiday craft show, glass artist Connie Munford suggested doing something with the tessellating patterns I use for my back drop. I researched companies that print custom designs on products and came across Spoonflower, a company that lets you design your own fabrics. Back in February, I ordered a sample of my walrus pattern to see what the quality is like. It turns out that the quality of their fabrics is very good and I made a pillow cover with the sample.

Not long after the pillow cover, I mustered the courage to make my first quilt.  I’ve been inspired by quilt patterns for years but thought it would be too difficult to make a quilt without a lot of sewing expertise and special equipment. While browsing the shelves of the Elliot Bay Bookstore, I came across a good book for beginners called Simple Geometric Quilting by Laura Preston . I considered designing custom fabrics for the quilt but given the cost of the fabric and my own lack of experience, I decided to use old sheets and pillow cases instead. It was a challenging project, but I learned enough to make a simple twin size quilt. With my new (and very basic) sewing skills, I was also able to make a few dozen face masks to donate to local hospitals at a time when masks were hard to come by.

I’m not sure what I’ll do with the new fat quarters. Each is a different type of fabric. There are a couple of canvas samples, a linen, and a denim. All are quite nice and will probably make good pillow covers but I think I’ll be ordering lighter fabrics in the future. It will be fun to make some tessellating pattern face masks and, at some point, I’d love to make another quilt. Now that I know I can do it, I’ll invest in the custom fabrics.

Pressing On

       

Well, we’re wrapping up two months in quarantine. Back in March when everything shut down, I ordered 4 boxes of clay from Seattle Pottery Supply thinking it was 100 pounds. Much to my surprise, 4 boxes of clay is actually 200 pounds. While I wasn’t sure I’d have space for the eight bags, I found the space and now I’m so glad I made the mistake. This clay is keeping me sane. In addition to pressing dozens of tiles for several new panels from existing designs, I’ve designed three new animal tiles. There are a lot steps in the making of a finished tile but the design phase is by far the most fun.

The dolphin and llama were inspired by fabric patterns. The baby bird was inspired by the House Finches currently building a nest in the Clematis vine above our patio. This isn’t the first year this pair of finches has nested in our vine. They were here a year or two ago and it was so much fun to see and hear the babies.

Be sure to check back in a month or two if you’d like to see the finished boards.

Installing a Ceramic Tile Mural – 8 Simple Steps

I recently corresponded with an art teacher named Ashley from Cumberland Regional High School in New Jersey. We were planning to do a video call next week to talk about the process of installing an outdoor ceramic mural. Unfortunately, because the Coronavirus has brought everything to a standstill, I don’t think that’s going to happen. I do, however, want to pass along my experience in mural making to Ashley and her students with some photos and notes. This health crisis will eventually pass and I really hope they get an opportunity to make their mural.

   

   

 

Installing a Ceramic Tile Mural

Materials

  • Tiles (fired to cone 5 or higher if outdoors)
  • Hardie board
  • Masonry screws
  • Fiberglass mesh tape
  • Fortified thinset (premixed recommended)
  • Aluminum angles
  • Construction adhesive
  • 1×2 Wood strips (width of mural)
  • Tile spacers
  • Painter’s tape
  • Grout (premixed recommended)

Tools

  • Measuring tape
  • Pencil
  • Paper or sketchbook
  • Straight edge for cutting Hardie board
  • Utility knife and spare blades
  • Level
  • Power drill or corded hammer drill
  • Hack saw with miter box or Dremel saw with a metal cutting blade
  • Small trowel
  • Rubber grout float
  • Tongue depressors (applying grout)
  • Buckets
  • Sponges
  1. Design

Lay tiles out on a flat surface to determine the size of your mural. Determine locations of the tile courses; measure them from the bottom of the mural. Mark this information on the Hardie board or on a separate sketch, with the dimensions, to refer to later.

  1. Cut Board

Once you’ve determined how large your mural will be, measure and mark the Hardie Board with a pencil. Using a straight edge (a 2×4 works well), cut the board with your utility knife.

  1. Install Board

Using a level and one or two helpers to hold the board in place, drive the screws through the Hardie board into the subsurface. If the subsurface is wood, a power drill will work but if the subsurface is concrete, a hammer drill may be required.

  1. Prep Board

Fill any screw holes with thinset.  Apply mesh tape over joints (if using more than one sheet of Hardie board). Coat mesh tape with a thin smooth layer of thinset.

  1. Aluminum Edges

Measure the perimeter lengths of the installed board. Using the hack saw and miter box or Dremel saw, cut the aluminum angles to fit the edges of the Hardie board (see detail of angle ends to make a clean corner). Glue the aluminum angles to the edges of the Hardie board with construction adhesive. Keep the angles in place with painter’s tape until dry.

  1. Determine Starting Point(s)

Start from the bottom and work up. Use tile spacers between the aluminum angle and the first row. Optional step – Cut and install 1×2 wood boards, using the level, at key courses in the mural design (refer back to your original layout sketch). This will allow you to work on several areas at a time.

  1. Set Tiles

Begin setting the tiles. Start in the center of the course and move horizontally to the outside edges, use the trowel to “butter” the back of each tile with thinset and push firmly against the Hardie board. Tiles will be adjustable for about 10 – 15 minutes depending on temperature/humidity. Once the first horizontal band is set, move up a row. Keep your level handy and check often. Refer back to the sketch and use tile spacers to make sure the rows align with those in your sketch. This way you’ll be sure to have the proper amount of space by the time you get to the top of the mural.

  1. Grout

Once the tiles are set and dried, cover the outside edges of your aluminum angles with painters tape for protection, and begin applying grout in sections. Depending on the type of tiles used this can be done with either a rubber float (if the tiles are flat and smooth) or tongue depressors (if the tiles are sculptural). You can wipe most of the grout from the tile surfaces with a dampened sponge while the grout is wet. Carefully remove painter’s tape while the grout is still wet. When the grout is dry give the tiles a good cleaning with a sponge and warm water.

Helpful Tips

  • Check the weather. It’s easier to tile on a clear, dry day.
  • Wear nitrile gloves when using thinset and grout.
  • Draw courses and key tile locations directly on the Hardie board with pencil before you start tiling.
  • It’s nice to have flexible areas of your mural where you can fill in tiles to adjust for courses that don’t quite match up to your sketch. For example, I used circular tiles fill in the area between the orca tile pattern and otter tile pattern. I was able to use as I many as I needed to fill that left over space.

Going to the Dogs

    

  

 

  

As some of you know, I make primarily two different types of tiles – tessellating animal tiles and sgraffito pet portrait tiles. Here are a few of my recent custom portrait tiles.

Because the tessellating tiles and portrait tiles are so different in technique, I’ve decided to open a second Etsy Shop. It’s called “ScratchingDogTiles” and you can go to this shop to order a portrait or to browse my current collection of shelter dog tiles (a portion of the sale of each shelter dog tiles is donated to local animal shelters in the Seattle area).

https://www.etsy.com/shop/ScratchingDogTiles